Nicole Lenzi
Statement 

Overview
In my art, I question what a drawing is and how it can affect thinking. Mark making, time, and space are integral to this investigation to expand my notion of the medium. Time is a system of measurement while space invites unusual formal dialogues. Eastern philosophy, Luce Irigaray, Avis Newman, metaphor, and post minimalism all influence my practice. I aim to create in between dimensions. It is there that drawing opens to what it can be.
 
Traditionally, drawing is a rendering of a subject on a two-dimensional surface. In my work, it is used as a tool to expand how to see and experience the medium and its relationship to thinking.
 
Avis Newman's statement, “A mark is sign of thought.”, informs my work on many levels. It encourages me to concentrate on what is happening in my mind as I work. How do thoughts form in relation to the movement of my hand or body? Do they align as my marks do, and then trail off and meet again? This led to an interest in the relationship between drawing and time. How is time experienced during the act of drawing? Does it fragment as a line bends?
 
Eastern philosophy informs and guides my practice. It encourages forming perspectives from an even, in-between place. The concept of non-hierarchy influences how works are conceived.  This idea is found at the core of Taoism and Luce Irigaray's feminism. These philospohies are perpetuated by the interplay of opposites; specifically through male/female relationships.  The masculine is considered hard edged and closed while the female is open and without boundaries. Coexistance between genders occurs  by yielding to the fluid feminine.

The spatial works Conglomerates stem from these concepts. They grow in relation to their environment and are composed of the common materials found there. This opens them to a mutual relationship with their surroundings. Shadow lines are traced between materials to forge dialogues.  These (shadow lines) then extend into the space, expanding the drawing activity.
 
Non-hierarchy also influences my multi-dimensional approach to drawing and, in turn, perpetuates my process. Installations, 3D, and 2D works function on the same level. This allows them to engage in an even relationship, each informing and redeveloping the other. The sketch, while often seen as a spring board for arriving at a fully realized work, is at the center of this, Sketches show a thought process; raw ideas and marks. I aim to preserve this quality in my works by leaving them at different stages of "finished". It creates a  space to finish a piece in the imagination.

Resulting works are frameworks for consideration.


 











 
 
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